A study of the ad-hoc, informal, incremental, yet purposeful actions of insurgent pubic space in Berlin, Germany
Post WWII East Berlin was first to rebuild, constructing the monumental and decorative “Workers’ Palaces,” along Stalinallee. Appalled by what many designers and politicians of the West considered a continuation of Nazi aesthetics, as a countermove West Berlin officials decided to rebuild the war ravaged area of Hansaviertel.
For the West the devastated area provided an opportunity to rebuild and draw attention to itself as the democratic bastion of freedom in the midst of the communist encirclement. Consequently, the development in Hansaviertel was designed as a manifesto of postwar urban planning and residential development intended to be in complete contrast to the Soviet Stalinallee.  

Post WWII East Berlin was first to rebuild, constructing the monumental and decorative “Workers’ Palaces,” along Stalinallee. Appalled by what many designers and politicians of the West considered a continuation of Nazi aesthetics, as a countermove West Berlin officials decided to rebuild the war ravaged area of Hansaviertel.

For the West the devastated area provided an opportunity to rebuild and draw attention to itself as the democratic bastion of freedom in the midst of the communist encirclement. Consequently, the development in Hansaviertel was designed as a manifesto of postwar urban planning and residential development intended to be in complete contrast to the Soviet Stalinallee.  

— 2 years ago with 1 note
#hansaviertel  #Berlin divided  #Berlin Modernism  #interbau 57  #West Berlin  #historical context 
  1. self-madepublicspace-berlin posted this